New Fair Food Fund Investment in Radicle Farm Company

Most people don’t think about the revolutionary potential of salad. But Christopher Washington, James Livengood, and Tony Gibbon

Disruptive Salads

The best way to have the freshest salad is to grow it yourself and harvest it right before your meal. But if that’s not an optio

It’s Alive: Radicle Farm Company Wants You to Save Salad Greens by Snipping Your Own

All produce that makes it from the market or grocery store to your table has one thing in common: It’s already dead. Of course d

These Salad Greens Keep Growing on Your Kitchen Counter

Salad greens have been getting a bad wrap in the news lately. Not only are pre-cut greens notoriously risky from a food safety per

These Salad Greens Keep Growing on Your Kitchen Counter

Salad greens have been getting a bad wrap in the news lately. Not only are pre-cut greens notoriously risky from a food safety perspective (Since the 2006 E. coli outbreak, all bagged lettuce now gets triple washed, but a 2010 Consumer Reports study says that spinach and other greens still harbor dangerous bacteria), but they also require considerably more water and other resourcesthan head lettuce. Worst of all: A great deal of it goes to waste. According to the Washington Post, as much as 1 billion pounds go to waste every year. For all these reasons, Christopher Washington, James Livengood, and Tony Gibbons are re-thinkingsalad greens. Their New York-based startup Radicle Farm Company is changing the way this American staple is grown, harvested, and delivered, and challenging assumptions about the way the 5 billion dollar bagged salad industry works.   READ MORE AT CIVIL EATS...

It’s Alive: Radicle Farm Company Wants You to Save Salad Greens by Snipping Your Own

All produce that makes it from the market or grocery store to your table has one thing in common: It’s already dead. Of course death leads to decay, and decay — in addition to perfectly edible food — often gets thrown away. According to Dana Gunders of the Natural Resources Defense Council, “40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten.” This waste occurs all along the supply chain, with one of the greatest losses in North America being fruits and vegetables purchased by consumers: 28 percent of these products go to waste according to a 2011 Food and Agriculture Organization study. Food waste frustrations were some of the seeds of Radicle Farm Company. Christopher Washington, James Livengood and Tony Gibbons came together with a shared disgust and put their skills together to form a small hydroponic greenhouse that is quickly outgrowing its walls. Their innovation is a simple one: They sell their greens alive, still growing in trays so that there is no decay between the farm and the plate. Just snip, wash and eat. Read More on Edible ...

Disruptive Salads

The best way to have the freshest salad is to grow it yourself and harvest it right before your meal. But if that’s not an option, perhaps the next best thing is to buy your salad greens at the supermarket in the form of a tiny living garden to bring home. That’s the pitch from Radicle, a new startup in Newark. “Instead of farm-to-table, it’s now a farm that’s on your table,” says Tony Gibbons, one of three partners who founded the Radicle Farm Company less than a year and a half ago. Radicle began in an 8,000-square-foot greenhouse in Newark’s Branch Brook Park, while supplying their novel product to a few upscale restaurants and a handful of Whole Foods Markets. They recently expanded to a 50,000-square-foot production facility in Utica, New York, that will give them the capability to serve more grocers and food retailers throughout the region and to provide fresh greens to hospitals and schools. “We really want to disrupt the way that people buy salad,” Gibbons says.   Read More At Edible New Jersey...

New Fair Food Fund Investment in Radicle Farm Company

Most people don’t think about the revolutionary potential of salad. But Christopher Washington, James Livengood, and Tony Gibbons are taking a fresh approach with Radicle Farm Company. Radicle Farm Company started in 2014 when Washington, Livengood, and Gibbons began producing hydroponic salad greens in a small greenhouse in Newark, New Jersey. It could have stopped there, but their passion for innovation spurred them to develop a new product: a “living salad.” Read More At Fair Food Network ...